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UPCOMING EVENTS

Pakistan National Forum on Women Health


  • Mobilizing political support for women’s health.
  • Setting up technical resources for essential and emergency obstetrical care.
  • Increasing awareness of fundamental, social and cultural causes of maternal death.

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OUR PROJECTS






KOOHI GOTH WOMEN’S HOSPITAL

Koohi Goth Women’s Hospital (KGWH) has been founded by the endeavors of socially conscious citizens of Karachi. The aim of the hospital is to provide free of cost quality.

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COMPUTER LAB AT QATAR HOSPITAL

KARACHI, Pakistan – “Computer Lab has given me a new understanding of the health care,” states a student of Midwifery at Qatar Hospital. In March 2010, with the help.

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NEWS FEED






Community Mobilization on Health issues

PNFWH is offering Comprehensive training on Community Mobilization on Health Issues.

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Two Sindh districts to become ‘fistula-free’

“Why do women have to leak for thirty long years before finally finding their way to us?” said Dr Shershah Syed, president of the Pakistan National Forum on Women’s Health (PNFWH), at a meeting held in a hotel here on Wednesday.

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Ill-trained surgeons blamed for fistula cases

Ill-trained surgeons and inadequate obstetric care facilities at government hospitals can be blamed for about 30 per cent of fistula cases — genital tract complications due to obstructed labour —reported every year in the country.

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Dr. Shershah Syed Clinton Global Inititive Award 2009

Dr. Sher Shah Syed founder of Pakistan National Forum on Women Health ( a non-government organization working for reproductive health) was invited to the CGI’s 5th annual meeting and his work on this issue was recognized.

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Fistula Project

Pakistan National Forum on Women's Health (PNFWH) is a nonprofit organization came into existence initially as National Advocacy Forum.

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MEDIA CENTRE






Leadership in maternal & newborn health: Dr Shershah Syed



Fistula Survivor Mehak talks to Gawaahi.

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SURVIVOR STORIES




Story of
GUL BANO

GulBano, resident of KohadastKhuzdar in Baluchistan, was put into marriage when she was not even 13. She became pregnant almost immediately, and spent the entire pregnancy at her husband’s native village where no antenatal care was available. According to GulBano, it didn’t matter because the antenatal period was uneventful anyway. She enjoyed her pregnancy after the initial few weeks of nausea and vomiting. The onset of labour was also normal at the estimated time. The local TBA (DAI) saw her at home and assured the family that she would have a normal vaginal delivery. She was in labour for two days, and the contractions were strong which made her feel exhausted and drowsy. At the end of these long two days and two nights, she delivered a dead fetus. She also had injury in perinanal area and developed fever. The TBA gave her some antibiotic to which she responded and become a febrile.
She was well for the first week, but on the eighth day she realized that she was passing urine and feces from the vagina. She, her husband and the local TBA did not have any a clue what was going on or what the nature of her problem was. She stopped venturing out of her mud house as she was dirty, smelling foul and nobody in the entire village wanted to talk to her. She herself felt that life had no future for her. Despite the support of her husband, which is a rarity in such cases, she seriously thought about committing suicide.
She had spent a miserable period of two years with the condition when her younger sister QusBano got married. Luckily, her husband knew of a center in Karachi where women VVF and RVF were being treated for free. He convinced the family to approach the center and so they all agreed to travel to Karachi to seek help.The long journey from the village took them two days through the mountains to reach the highway from where they took a wagon tide to reach Khuzdar, which is a small town some six hours away on the way to Quetta. From Khuzdar they took an eight-hour bus ride to reach the hospital at Karachi.This was the first time GulBano had ever traveled in a motorized vehicle. Not just that, it was her first experience of what a carpeted tarmac road was. She and her sister had never seen bulbs, television sets, hospitals, doctors, nurses, buildings … the list was long! She was week, anemic and needed treatment just to be fit enough to be operated upon. It was not before two months that surgery was finally scheduled. Initially, a colostomy was performed. After six weeks, a successful operation was performed to close the RVF, ad another six weeks later, the VVF was also repaired. After the RVF and the VVF were plugged, the colostomy was reversed.
GulBano was discharged a week before Eid, the traditional festival of Muslims across the world. By then she had spent seven months at the Koohi Goth Women’s Hospital in Karachi which is the Fistula Regional Center. A party was organized to celebrate her recovery, and she insisted on having a photograph with the whole team of doctors, nurses, paramedical staff, even the cooks and other staff with whom she had stayed for so long. The staff gave her new clothes as a mark of the new filth-free life which was embarking on after the recovery. She was told that she could even become pregnant; but that she would never have a normal delivery and that she should come back to the center where Caesarean Section facility was available. Today, GulBano is happy to have regained her lost status in the eyes of her family, community, society and, above all, in her own eyes. She has already brought to the Koohi Goth Hospital in Karachi a couple of women who were also suffering from the same ailment. She is a mobile ambassador of goodwill who spreads the word around where it needs to be spread.

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